A - Z BSL

BSL - Addictions

Someone has an addiction or addictive behaviour when doing, taking or using something gets out of control to the point where it could be harmful to them.

Alcohol and drug problems are very common. If you use drugs and/or alcohol and they are causing problems in other areas of your life such as your job, relationships, health, finances or emotional well-being, then this may be an issue for you. There are many other common addiction problems such as gambling, and nicotine, and it's possible to be addicted to just about anything, including: work, internet, sex, shopping.

Please note that this video is from a range of BSL videos published by NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

BSL - Bipolar Disorder

NHSGG&C BSL A-Z: Mental Health - Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar disorder is a mental health problem that affects your mood. It is characterised by prolonged changes to the person’s mood. These usually last several weeks or months and are far beyond what most of us experience. The person might experience:

  • Periods of feeling very low and down
  • Periods of feeling excessively happy and energetic for no apparent reason
  • Sometimes the person may have unusual experiences, strange thoughts or might behave out of character during these periods.

These episodes would usually affect the persons day to day life and make it difficult for them to function as they normally would.

Please note that this video is from a range of BSL videos published by NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

BSL - Depression & Anxiety

NHSGG&C BSL A-Z: Mental Health - Depression

Depression is a mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest. it affects how you feel, think and behave and can lead to a variety of emotional and physical problems. You may have trouble doing normal day-to-day activities, and sometimes you may feel as if life isn't worth living

NHSGG&C BSL A-Z: Mental Health - Anxiety

Anxiety is a feeling that we can all get but sometimes it can become excessive and stop you from doing the things you want to. These feelings can become a problem when they cause distress or make us feel uncomfortable. There are various types of anxiety disorders depending on how often they occur or if they are triggered by certain things. Examples might be when the feelings of anxiety can occur all the time for no apparent reason with lots of worrying thoughts and physical symptoms such as a racing heart, feeling breathless, knot in your stomach, increased sweating. This is called Generalised Anxiety. Sometimes these symptoms can occur without warning for short periods of time for no apparent reason. These are called Panic attacks. Sometimes the feelings of aniety can be brought on by specific things such as a fear of heights or crowded places or spiders etc. These are described as Phobias.

Please note that this video is from a range of BSL videos published by NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

BSL - Eating Disorders

NHSGG&C BSL A-Z: Mental Health - Anorexia Nervosa

A type of eating disorder where the person will restrict the amount of food they take in with a view to losing weight or maintaining a low body weight that is unhealthy. It is frequently associated with an increased pre-occupation with their weight and possibly perceiving themselves as being fat or over-weight even when this might not be the case.

NHSGG&C BSL A-Z: Mental Health - Bulimia Nervosa

A type of eating disorder where a person goes through periods where they eat a lot of food in a very short amount of time (binge eating) and then are deliberately sick, use laxatives (medication to help them poo) or do excessive exercise, or a combination of these, to try to stop themselves gaining weight.

Please note that this video is from a range of BSL videos published by NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde, and is not a description of the text on this website.

BSL - Generalised Anxiety Disorder

NHSGG&C BSL A-Z: Mental Health - Anxiety

Anxiety is a feeling that we can all get but sometimes it can become excessive and stop you from doing the things you want to. These feelings can become a problem when they cause distress or make us feel uncomfortable. There are various types of anxiety disorders depending on how often they occur or if they are triggered by certain things. Examples might be when the feelings of anxiety can occur all the time for no apparent reason with lots of worrying thoughts and physical symptoms such as a racing heart, feeling breathless, knot in your stomach, increased sweating. This is called Generalised Anxiety. Sometimes these symptoms can occur without warning for short periods of time for no apparent reason. These are called Panic attacks. Sometimes the feelings of aniety can be brought on by specific things such as a fear of heights or crowded places or spiders etc. These are described as Phobias.

Please note that this video is from a range of BSL videos published by NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

BSL - Sleep Disorder

NHSGG&C BSL A-Z: Mental Health - Sleep Disorder

Occasional sleep disturbance is common and quite a normal experience familiar to us all. Everyone experiences difficulty getting to sleep or staying asleep at some time in their lives. This often occurs at times of change or times of stress. Insomnia is a condition where you have problems getting to sleep or staying asleep for 3 or more nights per week and persisting for at least 6 months. There might also be daytime mood and performance effects.

People with insomnia often experience:

  • Difficulty falling asleep
  • Difficulty staying asleep
  • Frequent night time awakenings
  • Feeling very tired the next day

Please note that this video is from a range of BSL videos published by NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

BSL - Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

NHSGG&C BSL A-Z: Mental Health - Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a type of anxiety disorder. In this condition, the person suffers from obsessions and/or compulsions that affects their everyday life.

  • An obsession is an unwanted and unpleasant thought, image or urge that repeatedly enters your mind, causing feelings of anxiety, disgust or unease.
  • A compulsion is a repetitive behaviour or mental act that you feel you need to carry out to try to temporarily relieve the unpleasant feelings brought on by the obsessive thought.

If you have OCD these thoughts cause lots of anxiety and they can be extremely difficult to ignore. You might find that you spend lots of time worrying about what your thoughts mean. You might also complete behaviours to try and stop your feelings of anxiety.

Not everyone who experiences obsessions will have compulsive behaviours but often compulsive behaviours are very subtle and feel like a natural reaction to obsessive thoughts. You might perform a behaviour that seems unrelated to your original worry, for example repeating a certain word or phrase to yourself to “neutralise” a thought.

Some people can only suffer from obsessions, whilst others suffer from a mixture of both obsessions and compulsions.

Please note that this video is from a range of BSL videos published by NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

BSL - Panic Disorder

NHSGG&C BSL A-Z: Mental Health - Panic Attack

Panic attacks are sudden periods of intense anxiety which appear to have no obvious triggers or reasoning. They can happen when a person least expects it and can be very distressing and frightening for the person. They can be accompanied by physical symptoms such as a racing heart, feeling faint or dizzy, sweating, trembling, feeling shaky, breathlessness and agitation. The person may feel like they are losing control or dying. 

Please note that this video is from a range of BSL videos published by NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

BSL - Peri-Natal Depression

NHSGG&C BSL A-Z: Mental Health - Post-Natal Depression

Postnatal depression (PND) affects around 10% of mothers. This is much more serious than the period post birth known as ‘baby blues’ which usually lasts between one to three days. PND can develop slowly and may not be noticeable until several weeks after the baby’s birth, or may continue on from the baby blues period. The symptoms of postnatal depression are similar to those in depression at other times. These include low mood, sleep and appetite problems, poor motivation and pessimistic or negative thinking. It can have a significant impact on the health and wellbeing of the mother and the child

Please note that this video is from a range of BSL videos published by NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

BSL - Postpartum Psychosis

NHSGG&C BSL A-Z: Mental Health - Post-Partum Psychosis

It is a severe episode of mental illness which begins suddenly in the days or weeks after having a baby. Symptoms vary and can change rapidly. They can include high mood (mania), depression, confusion, unusual experiences and strange thoughts. Postpartum psychosis is a psychiatric emergency. You should seek help as quickly as possible.

Postpartum psychosis can happen to any woman. It often occurs ‘out of the blue’ to women who have not been ill before. It can be a frightening experience for women, their partners, friends and family. Women usually recover fully after an episode of postpartum psychosis.

It is much less common than Baby Blues or Postnatal Depression. It occurs in about 1 in every 1000 women (0.1%) who have a baby

Please note that this video is from a range of BSL videos published by NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

BSL - Phobias

NHSGG&C BSL A-Z: Mental Health - Phobias

A phobia is a type of anxiety disorder. It is an extreme form of fear or anxiety triggered by a particular situation (such as going outside) or object (such as spiders), even when there is no danger. For example, you may know that it is safe to be out on a balcony but feel terrified to go out on it or even enjoy the view from behind the windows inside the building. Likewise, you may know that a spider isn’t poisonous or that it won’t bite you, but this still doesn’t reduce your anxiety.

Someone with a phobia may even feel this extreme anxiety just by thinking or talking about the particular situation or object

Please note that this video is from a range of BSL videos published by NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

BSL - Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

NHSGG&C BSL A-Z: Mental Health - Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a type of anxiety disorder which you may develop after being involved in, or witnessing, traumatic events. A traumatic event is one where you are in danger, your life is threatened, or where you see other people dying or being injured.  Examples of traumatic events include road traffic accidents, assaults and sexual assaults, being involved in a natural disaster such as an earthquake, witnessing or experiencing war, torture or being held hostage.

It is usual for a traumatic event to cause upset and distress.  Most people will recover with the support and care offered by family and friends and by using the ways of coping that they would normally use to deal with stress.  However, some people will experience distress that is more intense and longer lasting and may result in Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Symptoms of PTSD include nightmares relating to the event, avoidance of things that may remind the person of the trauma, flashbacks, feeling on edge and always on the lookout for danger and negative changes in mood and thoughts

NHSGG&C BSL A-Z: Mental Health - Trauma

The situations we find traumatic can vary from person to person. There are many different harmful or life-threatening events that might cause someone to develop PTSD. A traumatic event is one where you see that you are in danger, your life is threatened, or where you see other people dying or being injured.

Please note that this video is from a range of BSL videos published by NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

BSL - Psychosis

NHSGG&C BSL A-Z: Mental Health - Psychosis

Psychosis is a term used to describe a number of unusual experiences:

  1. hearing or seeing things that other people can’t hear or see (hallucinations)
  2. holding unusual beliefs that people from a similar background would think strange or irrational (this includes delusions and paranoia)
  3. being so jumbled in thoughts or speech that other people can’t easily make sense of what you are meaning (thought disorder)
  4. experiencing periods of confusion - for example: becoming very distracted and finding it difficult to pay attention or make decisions

Psychosis can happen to anyone, up to 10 per cent of people will at some point in their life hear a voice talking to them when there is no-one there. Lots of things can contribute to a person experiencing psychosis such as stress, physical illnesses, using drugs or alcohol and mental illnesses

NHSGG&C BSL A-Z: Mental Health - Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a serious mental illness that affects thinking, emotions and behaviour. It is the most common form of psychosis. Schizophrenia usually affects people for the first time when they reach early adulthood - from their late teens to early thirties. Symptoms include:

  • Hallucinations - hearing, smelling, feeling or seeing something that isn’t there.
  • Delusions - believing something completely even though others find your ideas strange and can't work out how you've come to believe them.
  • Difficulty thinking – you find it hard to concentrate and tend to drift from one idea to another. Other people can find it hard to understand you.
  • Feeling controlled – you may feel that your thoughts are vanishing, or that they are not your own, or that your body is being taken over and controlled by someone else.

Other symptoms include:

  • Loss of interest, energy and emotions.
  • Problems with motivation and organising yourself.

Problems with routine jobs like washing, tidying, or looking after yourself

Please note that this video is from a range of BSL videos published by NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

BSL - Stress

NHSGG&C BSL A-Z: Mental Health - Stress

Stress is normal and it affects everyone. It usually happens when you are in a situation that puts you under pressure. It can happen when you have lots to think about or do or when you don’t feel you have much control over a situation. It usually happens when you have things to do that you find difficult to cope with. Many situations can cause stress including relationships, work demands, financial worries and so on. It can have an effect on our emotions, thoughts, behaviour and physical wellbeing

Please note that this video is from a range of BSL videos published by NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde

BSL - Suicide & Self-Harm

NHSGG&C BSL A-Z: Mental Health - Self-Harm

At times in our life we can all find it difficult to cope, sometimes we harm ourselves or think of ending our lives. Self-harm is a way of coping with very deep distress. The ways in which people harm themselves vary and can be physical such as cutting or less obvious such as putting themselves in risky situations or not looking after their physical or emotional needs.

NHSGG&C BSL A-Z: Mental Health - Suicide

Please note that this video is from a range of BSL videos published by NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde